Photo: Creative Commons

SYDNEY, Nov. 21 (Xinhua) -- Australian researchers on Wednesday said they are developing novel artificial intelligence technology that will allow people to self-diagnose skin cancer using smartphones.

The most critical cue for early diagnosis of skin cancer is changes in the appearance of moles and lesions over time,

"will allow a person to simply scan their body with a smartphone by taking a large number of high-resolution images,"

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